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Thomas Jefferson and His Time, Volume IV

The President, First Term 1801-1805

by Dumas Malone
Anna Fields

Audiobook

The fourth volume in this Pulitzer Prize–winning six-volume work recounts Jefferson's eventful first presidential term. Though characterized by calmer seas than his second presidential voyage, Jefferson's first years in office find him confronting a nation deeply divided following the administrations of Washington and Adams, and many subsequent conflicts. He acquires the vast territory of Louisiana for the United States, challenges the growing power of the federal judiciary, continues to press his opposition to the Hamiltonian doctrine of an overriding central government, assumes the unchallenged leadership of his party, and is universally acknowledged as the preeminent American patron of science and general learning.


Expand title description text
Publisher: Blackstone Audio
Edition: Unabridged

OverDrive Listen audiobook

  • ISBN: 9781483074412
  • File size: 541296 KB
  • Release date: June 22, 2005
  • Duration: 18:46:11

MP3 audiobook

  • ISBN: 9781483074412
  • File size: 541296 KB
  • Release date: February 6, 2007
  • Duration: 18:46:11
  • Number of parts: 19

Formats

OverDrive Listen audiobook
MP3 audiobook

Languages

English

Levels

Text Difficulty:8-12

The fourth volume in this Pulitzer Prize–winning six-volume work recounts Jefferson's eventful first presidential term. Though characterized by calmer seas than his second presidential voyage, Jefferson's first years in office find him confronting a nation deeply divided following the administrations of Washington and Adams, and many subsequent conflicts. He acquires the vast territory of Louisiana for the United States, challenges the growing power of the federal judiciary, continues to press his opposition to the Hamiltonian doctrine of an overriding central government, assumes the unchallenged leadership of his party, and is universally acknowledged as the preeminent American patron of science and general learning.


Expand title description text